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Resource Roundup – Reopen Checklist for Businesses

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham announced last week that some businesses can begin to reopen (in modified form) and that others might be able to on May 15. To help businesses prepare, the Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce shared this useful checklist:
  • Determine the square footage of your business and know how many customers can be inside the space at one time. Under possible new guidelines, businesses could be limited to 20% of your maximum capacity.
  • Consider how you will control access. How will you control deliveries, customers and visitors? Develop a plan for different areas of your business with safety and cleaning protocols. Under possible new guidelines, businesses could be asked to have designated entrances and separate exits.
  • Create a social-distancing plan to decrease density and rethink traffic patterns. Consider the possibility that you may have to install plexiglass shields at each point of sale area and/or floor signage that designates the appropriate wait line distancing.
  • Reduce touch points by leaving doors open, not requiring signatures on transactions, etc. There may be a need for additional cleanings between shifts or even between customers based on foot traffic into your business.
  • Will you need PPE for your employees, and can you purchase them?
  • Consider signage encouraging customer facial covering.
  • Have sanitizers available at entrances to your business.
  • Prepare to train staff for any new protocol.
These are just a few suggestions to consider, as we move forward in opening Santa Fe businesses.

What Do You Need to Do to Get Your Business Ready to Sell?

In his recent article in Smart Business entitled, “How to get your business, and yourself, ready for sale,” author Adam Burroughs explores the key points of getting your business ready to sell.  Burroughs points to the truism that, at some point, almost every business owner must sell his or her business.  For this reason, it is critical to think about what it takes to get your business ready to sell.  Simply stated, it is best to explore and plan for selling your business long before you actually need to place your business on the market.  Let’s explore some key points for selling your business.

Broadening Your Options

Burroughs interviews Scott McRill at Clark Schaefer Hackett.  McRill notes, “The sooner you think about your exit, the more options you’ll have for yourself and the business when the time comes.”  A savvy business owner will always want to give himself or herself as many options as possible. McRill wisely points out that early planning is key, and a failure to engage in early planning could lead to a lower selling price.  If you want to get the best price for your business, then planning for the eventual sale as far in advance as possible is a good move.

Planning in Advance

According to Burroughs, business owners should start planning to sell their business at least 2 to 3 years before they actually plan to sell.  Part of the reason for this is so that business owners will have enough time to make operational improvements designed to maximize the business’s overall value.

A Financial Review

At the top of every business owners “preparing to sell” list is to have a third-party review the business’s financial situation.  This is excellent advice for, as frequent readers of this blog know, any serious prospective buyer will look long and hard at your business’s financials.  Getting your business’s financial house in order means that you should turn to an accounting firm for help.  You’ll want to review financial statements for at least the previous 2 to 3 years. This will be a crucial step in arriving at your optimal valuation.

Burroughs points out that when it comes to selling a business, there are many variables that business owners often overlook.  At the top of the list is the management team.

Your Management Team

Prospective buyers can get very nervous about the stability of the management team once ownership has changed hands.  Often, the new buyer may only sign on the dotted line if the owner agrees to stay on after the sale during a transition period.  Having a competent and proven team in place, one that is dedicated to staying with the company will help you get your business ready to sell.

There are a lot of variables involved in preparing to sell a business.  The sooner that you get experts involved in the process, the better off you will be.  A business broker can serve as a guide – one that can point you in the right direction.  Find a broker with an abundance of experience, and you’ll have an invaluable ally who can help you navigate the process.  It can take a lot of time and effort to sell a business.  Working with a business broker can keep you from reinventing the wheel at every step of the process.

Is Your Business Ready to Sell?

“Even if you build a business with zero intention of selling it for a big payday, and even if you never do actually sell, you should still build your business as if you are going to sell it someday. Building a business with this mindset will make the entire operation run more efficiently—you’ll be able to see how your business is trending overall, maintain a cleaner financial picture, and implement better standard operating procedures,” writes Gregory Elfrink in this Foundr article.

It’s never too soon to prepare. There are all kinds of reasons to sell a business – retirement, cashing in on ROI, moving on to the Next Big Thing. Whatever your reason, you’ll want to maximize your profit. This requires preparation and forward thinking, and we can help.

Here are some areas to consider to make sure your business is sellable.

Money Talks

Buyers want to know they’ll be getting a business that will allow them to make money. The best way to prove your business fits that ticket is to have great financials. This means

  • Records over at least 3 years if possible
  • Strong (and, ideally, improving) cash flow, Seller Discretionary Earnings, and gross revenue
  • Well organized, professional documentation

Buyers understandably balk at weird numbers. If you have missing information or sloppy bookkeeping, they wonder what might be wrong or hidden. Consistent, professionally prepared P&Ls and taxes tell the most compelling story.

Value Proposition

Competitive advantage increases the value of your business. “If your competitors can’t match your differentiation without investing time, money and effort, buyers will pay more to have your edge,” writes Kevin Daum for Inc.

Standing out can be easier within a niche. “To maximize the value of your business, you are better off focusing on one or two areas that your business can do really well.  It’s much easier to duplicate your process with others this way, and it also increases the quality of the work you do as you can train and hire specialists as opposed to generalists,” says Shawn Sparks in this ThinkAdviser piece.

Onward and Upward?

Growth potential is another big factor. Do you have ideas to offer a buyer about how he or she might grow the business? Maybe there are untapped markets? Unexplored marketing channels? Tech-paved pathways to scale?

Identity Crisis

The success of the business can’t be wrapped up in your knowledge, relationships, charisma, etc.  A seller may support new ownership for a transition period, but make sure you have clear, accessible documentation on all operating procedures. If you have experienced managers on your team who can take the reins, all the better. A well-trained staff who will stay with the new owner is also helpful.

A (terribly burdensome!) way to vet your business’ ability to function without you is to take a vacation for a while. See where your systems snag in your absence and respond accordingly—rested and tan.

Distribute Your Eggs Over Enough Proverbial Baskets

Diversity in your client base and supply is important.  Customer concentration is a red flag to potential buyers. A company with more than 15 percent of its revenue dependent on one client is vulnerable. That client might leave shortly after you sell your business. A buyer will recognize this attrition risk. Follow these tips to minimize concentration trap for the potential buyer and better position your business to sell at a premium value. 

Likewise, multiple suppliers for all your products are important. According to Elfrink, this adds value in the following ways:

  • Profit Margin Increase: [Foundr has] had ecommerce sellers say flat out that they increased their profit margins by double percentage points simply by finding a different product supplier that gave them a much better deal.
  • Avoid Shutdowns: What happens if you only have one factory making your product and that factory suddenly goes out of business? You’re out of luck. You need backups for emergencies like this. Without a good supplier, you are effectively out of business.
  • Avoid Suppliers Getting Leverage on You: The supplier knows that without a product, you have nothing to sell, and they may try to increase their price over time, thinking that you will just accept the price hike. Having multiple suppliers will greatly increase your ability to negotiate for better terms.

Recurring Revenue

High-volume, reoccurring revenue indicates stable, ongoing success. Customer renewal saves on acquisition, indicates a satisfying product or service, and provide a bankable model, according to “exit guru” John Warrillow. “If you currently eat what you kill, find a way to make your product or service renewable and addictive,” he suggests.

Timing

So many factors are involved in determining if the time is right to sell your business. What are the prevailing market conditions? How are your financials trending? Do you have everything in ready, in ideal order to maximize your profit? A business broker can help identify and answer all the questions you should be asking.

Contact Us to Learn More

If you’d like to learn more or sell a business, contact us! We can help you assess all these criteria and perform a valution to determine the right price to bring your business to market.