The Sunbelt New Mexico Blog

ABQ Ranked in Top 10 for Affordable Cities and Cities to Build Wealth

Albuquerque was recently ranked America’s ninth most affordable city by Move.org. The comparison of 75 major U.S. cities considered the following factors:

  • Rent for a 1-bedroom apartment
  • Utilities (electricity, water, etc.)
  • Internet
  • Gasoline
  • Food (groceries plus occasional restaurant meals

Rounding out the top ten were El Paso, TX; Lincoln, NE; Toldeo, OH; Wichita, KS; Louisville, KY; Tulsa, OK; Memphis, TN;  Lexington, KY; Albuquerque, NM; and Mesa, AZ.

The top five most expensive cities were San Francisco, CA; New York, NY; San Jose, CA; Oakland, CA; and Boston, MA.

Significantly, Albuquerque’s low cost of living contributes to its also being ranked one of the top five cities in which to build wealth by pay experts Salary.com.  This ranking, “based on census data and Salary.com analysis, focused on local salaries, the cost of living, and unemployment. Secondary factors, such as diversity of the local economy, residents’ education, percentage of population below poverty level, and commute time were also measured,” according to CNN Money.

Learn about opportunities to buy a business in ABQ here.

(Infographic by Albuquerque Economic Development)

11 Reasons to Do Business in Albuquerque

In more #AlbuquerqueAscending news, economic development and media company Livability lists 11 reasons why ABQ is the perfect place to do business.

“The Southwestern city is witnessing an entrepreneurial renaissance with the help of startup-friendly culture, excellent universities and a great cultural scene for that ever elusive work-life balance. Albuquerque’s tech scene is so vibrant that even Facebook is setting up an outpost in the area, and the city has seen a nearly 10% increase in average salaries over the last four years. With STEM jobs galore, Albuquerque also earned a spot on our 2018 list of the Top 10 Best Cities for STEM Workers,” Claire Hannum reports for Livability.

The list focuses on Abq’s business-friendly and innovative economic, policy, and cultural environments.

1. There’s no shortage of startup incubators.
2. Tech companies love it here.
3. There’s plenty of funding to be found.
4. The city encourages tech innovation that benefits the economy.
5. There are excellent co-working spaces.
6. Albuquerque provides support for female entrepreneurs.
7. You can make your business official in less than a day.
8. You can work from home without losing your mind.
9. The great outdoors are right in your backyard.
10. You’ll never run out of amazing food to try.
11. And you’ll always be able to end your day with a cold beer.

Find out more about great opportunities to join the vibrant community of Albuquerque business owners.

 

Photo Credit: MarbleStreetStudio.com

Tumbleweeds, Beloved Community Resource, on the Market

Tumbleweeds, an early and mid-childhood development magazine loved by parents and educators, is now on the market. Long-time owner Claudette Sutton is ready to move onto her next projects after decades of growing the publication into a staple resource for northern New Mexico families.

Listed at $95,000 with a cash flow of $50,000, this home-based business allows for a flexible, part time schedule and engagement with a passionate, grateful community. The publication enjoys an established advertising base, strong distribution, and a dedicated team of writers, designers, and editors.

A recent article in Santa Fe New Mexican highlights community appreciation for the publication’s helpful content:

“Where would parents and teachers be without Tumbleweeds?” said Joani Kennedy, who has operated the Wee Spirit Preschool in Santa Fe since 1984. She’s been a Tumbleweeds reader since the beginning [in 1995].

“There are profound articles for teachers and people to solve the wonderful problems that come with working with children,” Kennedy added.

Tumbleweeds grew out of a four-page newsletter, Tot’s Hot News, that Sutton started in 1991 focusing on early childhood. By 1995, it had grown to 16 or 20 pages and was addressing increasingly older children. Sutton upgraded to a magazine format with Tumbleweeds.

“I was realizing a lot of articles were not just for parents of young children but children in elementary school and approaching teens,” she said.