The Sunbelt New Mexico Blog

Should You Buy a Turnkey Business?

There are plenty of benefits to purchasing an existing business, but running a successful business can become overwhelming. If you’re considering buying a small business, but don’t know if you have enough time to commit to a significant venture, then a turnkey business model might be the right fit for you. Continue reading to discover if you’re someone who should buy a turnkey service business.

3 People Who Should Consider a Turnkey Service Business

Turnkey opportunities exist in a variety of industries including painting, cleaning, financial services, and more. Even if you’re not an expert in the industry, a true turnkey business provides everything except for staff. That means you can skip the stressful startup and jump right in. If you identify with one of the following characteristics, a turnkey service business might be the right choice for you.

  1. Entrepreneurs Looking for a Side Hustle

    As an entrepreneur, you’re continually seeking ways to earn money in addition to your current commitments. Buying a turnkey business doesn’t typically require you to drop your full-time job, or any other side hustles to be successful. Once you learn how to manage the company, you’re in control of your schedule and your workload.

    Compared to a franchise opportunity, turnkey operations often cost more to purchase initially. However, long-term costs are lower because you aren’t required to pay franchise fees, royalties, and marketing fund fees. Plus, a non-franchise, turnkey business doesn’t obligate you to follow regulations and guidelines when running your new gig. Owning and running your service-based turnkey business on your terms can help you achieve financial freedom.

  2. Seasonal Business Owners

    Whether you own an ice cream shop or a window-washing business, your goal is the same. You aim to make as much as you can during your most lucrative months. Buying an established turnkey service business can supplement your income during both your busy season and off season, creating an opportunity to drastically increase cash flow every year.

    With an established turnkey business, the services provided have already been defined and proven, so your startup phase is minimal. You may even be able to find a company that compliments a business you already own. Not only is this a fantastic way to generate additional income during your off-season, but it also provides more service variety for your existing customer base.

  3. Retirees Seeking a Job with Flexible Hours and Low Commitment

    During retirement, you can appreciate your free time without having any commitments or obligations to attend to. But sometimes, you desire additional activities and responsibilities, or you may want to supplement your savings. Investing in a turnkey business opportunity allows you to create your schedule and work as little or as much as you want. The more you work, the more chances you have to earn money, but a service-based business doesn’t have to require a high level of commitment. If you need a specific day or week off, you can always schedule around your obligations.

If any of the above descriptions make you think that you’re someone who should purchase a turnkey service business,we can help. Look through our listings to find the turnkey business for you or contact us to get started!

Corporate Social Responsibility and Preparing Your Business to Sell

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is increasingly seen as something that companies of all sizes need to be aware of, so let’s take a closer look at a few of the finer points.

There are 4 basic pillars in CSR: the community, the environment, the marketplace and the workplace.  The community pillar of CSR refers to your company’s contribution to the local community; this contribution can take a variety of forms ranging from financial support to personal involvement. There are 4 basic pillars in CSR: the community, the environment, the marketplace and the workplace.  The community pillar of CSR refers to your company’s contribution to the local community; this contribution can take a variety of forms ranging from financial support to personal involvement. Millenials are especially interested in using their growing purchasing power to support companies that share their values.  According to Forbes, “75% of Millennials consider it fairly or very important that brands give back to society instead of just making a profit.” They  care that brands practice authenticity, local sourcing, ethical production, a great shopping experience, and giving back to society.

The second pillar of CSR is the environment.  The simple fact is that people around the world are becoming much more environmentally aware.  You can be quite certain that a percentage of your customers and/or clients have environmental concerns.

Increasingly, consumers want to know that the companies that they are purchasing from have good environmental practices.  There are many ways that businesses can show that they are environmentally aware.  They range from recycling and using low-emission and high-mileage vehicles whenever possible to adopting packaging and containers that are environmentally friendly.

The third pillar of CSR is the marketplace.  Proper corporate social responsibility includes the responsible utilization of advertising, public relations, and ethical business conduct.  Another key element in the marketplace pillar is adopting fair treatment policies towards suppliers and vendors, contractors and shareholders.  In other words, the marketplace aspect of CSR means rejecting exploitative business practices in favor of fairer and more equitable business practices.

The final pillar of CSR concerns the workplace.  In the workplace pillar, CSR encourages the implementation of fair and equitable treatment of employees, as well as observing workplace safety protocols and embracing equal opportunity employment and labor standards. We’ve written before about fostering a culture of employee engagement. Research shows that employee engagement tends to rise in response to a strong connection to a business’ vision and mission.

Adopting CSR practices in today’s business climate is a prudent decision, as it serves to increase both shareholder and investor interest, while simultaneously encouraging a company’s value.  Likewise, embracing CSR practices can make it easier to attract a buyer and that party may be willing to pay a higher selling price. CSR helps you to create and share a compelling narrative about your business. These stories are powerful vectors of brand awareness and loyalty.  It helps you to focus on what your stand for and reinforcing people’s association between you and those values.

Typically, buyers want a business that has many of the attributes supported by the four pillars of CSR.  Buyers want businesses that enjoy a high level of customer loyalty and have good overall relations with the local community.  Additionally, buyers want businesses that have quality relationships with their suppliers and vendors as well as loyal and dependable employees.

Sellers must realize that buyers want products, goods and services that are in line with the current trends of the marketplace and have an eye towards future trends.  Finally, buyers want as little “baggage” as possible.  You can be certain that buyers don’t want to find any skeletons lurking about in the company closet.  The proper utilization of CSR can address all of these concerns and, in the process, make your business more attractive to a potential buyer.

What Do You Need to Do to Get Your Business Ready to Sell?

In his recent article in Smart Business entitled, “How to get your business, and yourself, ready for sale,” author Adam Burroughs explores the key points of getting your business ready to sell.  Burroughs points to the truism that, at some point, almost every business owner must sell his or her business.  For this reason, it is critical to think about what it takes to get your business ready to sell.  Simply stated, it is best to explore and plan for selling your business long before you actually need to place your business on the market.  Let’s explore some key points for selling your business.

Broadening Your Options

Burroughs interviews Scott McRill at Clark Schaefer Hackett.  McRill notes, “The sooner you think about your exit, the more options you’ll have for yourself and the business when the time comes.”  A savvy business owner will always want to give himself or herself as many options as possible. McRill wisely points out that early planning is key, and a failure to engage in early planning could lead to a lower selling price.  If you want to get the best price for your business, then planning for the eventual sale as far in advance as possible is a good move.

Planning in Advance

According to Burroughs, business owners should start planning to sell their business at least 2 to 3 years before they actually plan to sell.  Part of the reason for this is so that business owners will have enough time to make operational improvements designed to maximize the business’s overall value.

A Financial Review

At the top of every business owners “preparing to sell” list is to have a third-party review the business’s financial situation.  This is excellent advice for, as frequent readers of this blog know, any serious prospective buyer will look long and hard at your business’s financials.  Getting your business’s financial house in order means that you should turn to an accounting firm for help.  You’ll want to review financial statements for at least the previous 2 to 3 years. This will be a crucial step in arriving at your optimal valuation.

Burroughs points out that when it comes to selling a business, there are many variables that business owners often overlook.  At the top of the list is the management team.

Your Management Team

Prospective buyers can get very nervous about the stability of the management team once ownership has changed hands.  Often, the new buyer may only sign on the dotted line if the owner agrees to stay on after the sale during a transition period.  Having a competent and proven team in place, one that is dedicated to staying with the company will help you get your business ready to sell.

There are a lot of variables involved in preparing to sell a business.  The sooner that you get experts involved in the process, the better off you will be.  A business broker can serve as a guide – one that can point you in the right direction.  Find a broker with an abundance of experience, and you’ll have an invaluable ally who can help you navigate the process.  It can take a lot of time and effort to sell a business.  Working with a business broker can keep you from reinventing the wheel at every step of the process.